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How to Leash Train A Puppy
How to Leash Train A Puppy

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How to Leash Train A Puppy

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Leash training can help your puppy safely explore the world beyond your house or backyard. It can enhance your dog’s walking experience and help you bond with it better. We must remember that dogs are not born with the ability to walk on a leash, they need to be taught. As their caregivers, we need to help them learn this skill comfortably. 
 

If you have a large breed pup, it is imperative that you train it while it is still young. Once your fur baby grows up to be heavy, you will have a tough time handling it on a leash. You do not want to be dragged along the ground or see your dog get into an easily avoidable fracas. 
 

In case you are wondering at what age to start leash training a puppy, here’s your answer: You are start at 10 weeks of its age, however, you must know that it can be done earlier. It will help your pup grow into an obedient pawsome pal. Leash training also makes it easier for you to travel with your pet and embark on exciting adventures seamlessly! Train your puppies while they are still young as it will stay with them for the rest of their lives. 
 

If you are facing any trouble with how to teach your puppy to walk on a leash, here are some tips to get you started:

  • Pick the right collar

Picking the right collar is the first step to getting your dog used to a puppy leash. It is imperative that your fur baby feels comfortable in it. So, make sure that the collar is neither too tight nor too loose; there should be space for at least two fingers under it. While leash training your puppy, breathability and comfort is of paramount importance. 
 

Note: If you plan on training your puppy at an early age, stay attentive during sessions. Since your little furry friend will be at a developing stage, it will outgrow its collar soon. Make sure that you keep checking the fit of the collar and change it as and when needed.

  •  Introducing your puppy to a leash

Your puppy will need some time to get used to the leash. For puppies, this is an alien thing, and they will need some time to adjust and accept this new accessory. You can help your pup ease into this process by trying a few tricks. It needs to resonate a leash with fun times. Let it spend some time playing with the leash. You can also make your canine companion wear it every time you are having a fun time together at home. Do not put it on when it is alone, sad, or irritated.

  • Treats go a long way

As you teach your puppy how to walk on a leash, remember that rewarding it with treats will only promote good behavior. Grab a treat in your hands and take a few steps back. This will encourage your pooch to walk towards you to devour its favorite treat. To avoid overeating, you can also reward the pup with toys, praises, or belly rubs. 


Note: Do not stretch your dog’s leash training for prolonged hours. It might get exhausted and shy away from training.

  • Indoor practice

Indoor practice is the best way of gauging how your canine companion fares with the concept of walking on leash. This will also help you get your puppy used to the leash without losing control of it. Choose a decent stretch of floor in your home, make sure there are no obstructions, and just start walking with your puppy on a leash. At the end of one stretch, reward it with treats. Stay attentive during these session to know when your pup is ready for the world outside your home.

  • Start with short outdoor walks

Teaching your puppy how to walk on a leash is going to be full of surprises. If you think that your pet will easily walk on a leash outdoors once it has learnt to do it indoors, you are mistaken. Being curious is only natural and that is exactly what will happen once your four-legged friend realises that it is not at home anymore! Your dog will want to sniff every corner, every plant, and whatever it sets its eyes on. Hence, start with short outdoor walks! 
 

Note: Carry some treats with you to encourage your puppy to follow you! 

 

Remember that patience is key! And your furry friend is not the only one who needs to be patient during this process. Your puppy is going to need some time to get used to this walking style and you need to give it that time. Moreover, make sure that this transition is smooth and comfortable for your pup. Once you start putting these tips into action, you two can start taking long strolls together.

Frequently asked questions

  1. At what age should you start leash training a puppy?
  2. You can start leash training your puppy once it turns 10 weeks old.

  3. How do I get my puppy to stop pulling on the leash?
  4. The best way to stop your puppy from pulling on the leash is to change the direction by using the command ‘turn.’

  5. Is it OK to drag a puppy on leash?
  6. No. Dragging your puppy on leash is not healthy. Along with injuring your fur baby’s neck and knees, it will also ignite negative feelings towards you.

  7. Is a collar or harness better for a puppy?
  8. A puppy should use both a collar and harness. A collar can be worn every day to hold ID tags, whereas a harness can be used for walks and other activities.

  • Choosing the Right Dog Food
    Choosing the Right Dog Food
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    Choosing the Right Dog Food

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    Author: Dr. Diah Pawitri
     

    When visiting the store, dog owners can get overwhelmed by the array of dog food options available, from dry kibble to canned wet food and more. These processed foods may not be appealing to humans, but they contain all the nutrients that dogs need to stay healthy. Like humans, dogs also need a variety of nutrients from their food, not just from meat as their main diet, but also from grains, vegetables, and fruits. This kind of balance is usually weighed by pet food labels in kibbles or wet food in grams for different types of dogs. 
     

    For optimum health, dogs need food that is tailored and customized to their life stages, starting from when they are puppies and all the way into adulthood. Puppies have completely different nutrient needs compared to adult dogs as they are still in their early stages of life. They need enough nutrients to fuel a speedy growth, especially after transitioning away from their mother's milk. Puppies require complete and balanced nutrition with protein to help build their tissues, fats or healthy skin, hair, brain, and vision, carbohydrates for energy, vitamins, minerals, and water.

    The need for balanced nutrients in puppies starts with the mother during pregnancy, followed by lactation and growth. Sufficient nourishment for the mother is pivotal in enhancing the puppies’ growth inside the womb and preparing them for life after birth. Both mother and puppy should receive well-proportioned antioxidants, DHA, and prebiotics to support their health and growth as provided by the IAMS product line, which contains DHA that is essential for puppies' brain development while also supporting the mother's pregnancy and quality of milk produced. 
     

    While puppies need the primary nutrients for growth, adult dog food has a different level of complexity. Adult dog food requires the same make-up of nutrients as puppies do but tailored to their specific needs. Recent research indicates that an adult dog requires at least 10% of its daily calories from protein and at least 5.5% from fat. Adult dogs need quality protein for firm muscles and a healthy immune system. Additionally, an adult diet can contain up to 50% carbohydrates, with fiber ranging from 2.5 to 4.5%. There is no specific prescribed amount of fibre for adult dog consumption daily, however, it is still one of the most important components in dog food to address constipation and support a healthy weight.
     

    Adult dogs in their prime also require a balance in antioxidants to reduce systemic inflammation and restore active muscles. They should receive Vitamin E and C to support their immune system, joint health, and prevent inflammation. As they grow older, they may be exposed to different diseases from diabetes to cancers, which can be prevented by polyphenols.  Parents to adult dogs must acknowledge the most suitable food for their loved one that is comprised of the right amount of nutrients and can look to the IAMS line as they are formulated to support healthy bones and joint health, scientifically proven for healthy digestion with a good fibre and prebiotic blend, as well as antioxidants for a strong immune system.
     

    Besides life stage, balanced nutrition should be adjusted to their breed, which give insight to different factors like weight, mouth size, and energy level. This will then determine the type of kibble and food given. Smaller breeds tend to be more active, requiring the same essential nutrients and prebiotics for a healthy body as well as smaller-sized kibble designed specifically for their smaller mouths. As smaller dogs relatively have a high metabolism, higher levels of protein, fat, and essential fatty acids like omega 3 and omega 6 are some of the important nutrients that should be available in their food. On the other hand, larger breeds require foods that are lower in fat and calories, contain slightly lower levels of calcium and phosphorus, and have a specific balance of calcium-to-phosphorus ratio to support stronger bones and muscles.  Owners can look to products like the small breed line from IAMS, containing 7 essential nutrients to build strong muscles, support their tiny immune system while protecting their healthy skin and coat, and the product line for adults for large breeds.
     

    Dog parents must acknowledge and understand the unique needs, life stage and characteristics in their dog to choose the right dog food so their furry ones can grow into their healthiest selves. Make sure to visit your vet regularly to check these components as well!